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October 













(JUe are Nom Operating Our Ocun Rolling M'Hs. 



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cPl -rAbOGa£: 



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ineinnati 




onrugatinq . 




to.ooo ro*>#t 







ompany 



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SUPERIOR CORRUGATED 



AND 



OTHER SHEET METAL BUILDING MATERIAL 






V • 









The F'Hst Strictly Corrugot ng Company in America 




Entered according to Act of Con 
Cincinnati Corrugating Co., in the 
Congress, at Washington. 



s, in the year 1889, by the 
Office of the Librarian of 



IRON. 



STEEL 



CORRUGATED ROOFING, 

CORRUGATED SIDING, 



CORRUGATED CEILING. 



CORRUGATED ARCHES 



> 



CORRUGATED LATH, 



CORRUGATED SHUTTERS 



CORRUGATED DOORS 




STANDING SEAM PLAIN .ROOFING, 

V CRIMPED ROOFING 



ROLL AND CAP ROOFING 



METALLIC WEATHER BOARDS, 

RIDGE CAPPING, 



BEADED CEILING. 



f CORNICE- 




! 



Estimates Furnished ™ j gutters, 

^ IRON PIPE 



PAINTED. 



GALVANIZED. 




SUPERIOR. 



WE ARE LEADERS 





Gold Medal of the First Class Awarded in 1885 by the First World's In 

dustrial and Cotton Centennial Exposition at New Orleans. 



• • 



TO - - 



The Cincinnati Corrugating Co. 



Our Stock is never Less than i ,000 Tons. This insures prompt Shipments 



COPYRIGHTED. 






i 



\ 



The Cincinnati Corrugating Co. 



GENERAL OFFICE, ROLLING MILLS, AND FACTORY, 



FiGpa, O^io, August I8t^ 1559. 



To our Customers and the Trade Generally : 

More than a year ago it became evident that our buildings on Eggleston 
Avenue, Cincinnati, although containing 30,000 square feet of floor surface, were 
becoming too limited for the increasing business of our establishment, which has 
ahvavs been the most extensive in its line in the United States. Hence we were 
compelled to consider the question of a more available location. 

After comparing the advantages of several localities, we finally decided in 
favor of Piqua, Ohio; a thriving manufacturing city most eligibly situated, about 
80 miles north of Cincinnati. We have been preparing during the greater part of 
the year 18S9 for the removal and re-establishment of our plant at this place, where 
we shall enjoy facilities unequaled heretofore by anyone in our line of business, 
and unsurpassed at the present time. 

In our new location we have the most modern Rolling Mills, operated 
by natural gas, and under our sole control; the most improved processes of 
annealing, forming, galvanizing, and painting our iron and steel sheets ; machinery 
for grinding and mixing our paints; ample buildings and grounds, comprising 
14 acres, for extending any buildings made necessary by the development of our 
specialties, as well as unusually good railroad connections for obtaining the lowest 

freight rates. 

The control of the output of the Rolling Mills, both in quality and for quick 
delivery, without interruption from other customers for its products, will enable 
us to eclipse our former record of superior quality and prompt shipments in fur- 
nishing our patrons with reliable, durable and satisfactory Corrugated and Plain 

Roofings, Sidings, etc. 

We trust that we shall be favored with a continuance of your patronage, and 
request that hereafter you will address all communications to 

Yours Truly, 

THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO, 

PIQUA, OHIO. 



/ 



THI ClXCnO LTI CORRUGATIX* CO PIQ* O. 



Corrugated Sheet Metal. 



N England and A 
for Roofing Sidin 




in 



looser than 



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a 



other fin 



t -r ner.: - — - 





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first cost is 
fiftv vears or more. Hence, in the D S 

generallv. by Railroad Co 

. r- Lath 



been a preferred form of co verin i' for 




Building Pnblic 




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ce, as well as 



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of sheet 









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acture to which it is attac-ied by its 
rotated Iron Roofs put on over twenty- 



zve veir. ago 



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To build up our business to its 

compelled to raise the sta 



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ndarc of 





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re to the high- 



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We use 




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- ealed iron and steel, all res 




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n dies by sfc 




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and for 



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now is to popularize Cor 



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heet Metal on its 




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Cormzated Ir 



will not rattle fro 



nsion. contraction or wind, 



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nd buckle and present ugly and c 







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is only necessar; U> suggest the adv; 



e of using this material 



for proti 
bv their 




le 



Wis*.. - 



te its value 



2=2- 26 and 24 Iron are more generally used t 




gauges for 







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- i r i i'.tit-r*- we kttp ani sell 




-* 



all gauges 01 




:i::>r ; -: ; 



t =: :e 





- : : 1 




i't ittail- -::.- 5; seepage-:: 



spaces to be covered- In s-nch 

14, 15. i( and 1 - 



Per <9^r the Best at the Price of the Cheapest 



COPYRICHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRVGATING CO., PIQUA, O 



5 




Fig. 1. 




Shows our Straight Corrugated Sheet; 10 corrugations 2^ inches 
wide by ) & inch deep in interior, and y& inch deep at edges. 

Regular lengths in stock, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9 and 10 feet. 

When lengths are not specified we always ship 8 feet sheets. 

All widths are uniform. 

Full widths are 26 inches ; Covering widths 24 inches. 

When this iron is attached directly to studding or rafters which run 
in the same dire&ion the sheets do, the distance between the centers of 
the studding or rafters must be 24 inches. However, we do not advise 
this method of applying, except on cheapest Buildings. 

See Instructions for laying Corrugated Iron, pages 13, 14 and 15. 

It is the custom of the trade generally, as is ours, in selling by the 
square, to furnish a number of sheets, the total superficial measurement 
of which equals 100 sq. ft. That is, without allowance for laps. 

This is especially proper in Corrugated Iron, which is used for so 
many purposes, varying so much in requisite amount lapped, or for some 
uses not requiring lapping at all. 

RULE FOR ESTIMATING ON 2^-INCH CORRUGATED SHEETS. 

For Roofing.-Selea the most economical of our regular lengths of 
sheets to cover vour rafters, (allowing 3 inches end laps, and say 6 inches 
projection at eaves). Then add the lengths of sheets seletfed; then 
multiply their total length by the length of Ridge, adding 7 per cent. 

Where SWING is no higher than the length of one sheet, add 7 per 
cent more squares of iron than the space will measure; when there are 
two or more rows, add 8 to 10 per cent., varying with amount lapped at 

end. 




Regular Lengths, 5, 6, 7- 8, 9 and 10 feet Widths, 26 inches. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



6 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO. PIQUA. O 




Fig. 3. 




Fig. 3 above shows a Ridge Roof Frame Structure of simplest form, 
in process of being covered with our Corrugated Iron, and also shows 
application of Iron Ridge Cap, more fully shown just below. 

. 4. 





Re~ "ar Lengrth- 6 feet. Made in two sizes 



This Cap is requisite for covering the joints on Ridges and Hips of 
Rools, as well as for a finished appearance, as in Fig. 16. 

Fig. 5. 




Shows our Joint of Corrugated Wood, for going between Fig. 4 and 
the corrugated Roofing, on each side of Ridge of the Roof. 



AlUw Corrugated Roofing three inches pitc* or more, to the foot 

COPYRIGHTED. 



1 



\ 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



7 




This Joint is flat on one side, going next to the Cap, and corrugated 
on the other side to fit the corrugations of the Roofing. 

This Joint is just the thing to use where Corrugated Roofing abuts 
against a wall where flashing is to be used -the flashing to be nailed 
over the joint and to the wall ; used only with 2>^-inch corrugations. 

Ridge Joint is not absolutely required, except at ridges of roofs 
having less than three inches fall to the foot. 

Pig. 6. 




Shows a Corrugated Sheet Curved. These can be curved to any 
desired radius, within bending capacity of the material. 

In ordering refer to Fig. 23. 

We make these to spe:ifications required, of Iron or Steel, and give 
especial attention to exactness in this kind of work, having a large 
patronage from the leading Architectural Iron Works, Bridge Works 

Builders, etc. 

These sheets are in very general use, for purposes other than those 

indicated, as they present a handsomely finished appearance, and often 
save expense in construction; e. jr., for Lantern or Ventilator Roofs, 
Dormer Windows, etc. 



Fie. 7. 




Shows a section of Cor- 
rugated Iron or Steel Arch, 
for Fire-Proof Buildings, 
etc., in which our Corru- 

Curved Sheets are 



gated 
used. 



Send for special circulars on Arches. 

These sheets rest on lower flanges of the beams, the space above 
being filled with concrete to, or above, the top of beams, as desired. 

These Arches, for strength, lightness, durability, and fire-proof 

qualities, cannot be excelled. 

Corrugated Arches have often been tested, and when No. 18 W. G. 
has been used, have never shown any deflection at a pressure of 1,000 
lbs. per square foot, and very little deflection at 2,000 or 3,000 lbs. per 
square foot. (Trautwine, page 371, Ed. 1883.) 




Use 2%-ifieh Corrugation for Curvea Sheets. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



8 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQI A, O. 



y 




The Weight of the Arches with the concrete filling on top of beams 
is very little over one-half that of a brick arch and concrete filling 
to the same height, thus allowing fewer or lighter beams to be used and 

lessening the load on the walls. 

These floors are from 25 to 40 per cent, cheaper than those built of 
brick arches, or in fact any other fire-proof floor. 

Curved Ceilings, when painted suitably, present a very beautiful finish. 

The uses of Curved Sheets for Roofing, Ceiling and other purposes 
are infinite; and many will suggest themselves to the reader besides 
those here named. 

Fig. 8. 




Shows our Corrugated Elevator Siding for sides of any building 

liable to much settling. 

These sheets are made of our regular widths (page 5) but usually, 
say thirty-two inches long, so they need be nailed only on the lower end; 
our Patent Edge Corrugations stiffening the sheets so much that nailing 
at sides is unnecessary. 

Each sheet is nailed two inches above the edge and there is an inch lap, 
allowing the sheet to slide an inch, before the nails, by which it is attached, 
impinge on the lower sheet ; each sheet, in fact, acts independently. 

The Sheets being applied with one-inch end lap and the nails being 
one inch above the upper edge of the lower sheet, the sheets are enabled 
to slide one inch in thirty-two inches, as the sides of the Elevator settle, 
and will not buckle or draw the nails. 

In an Elevator, as all know, the strain is on the outer wall, when it 
fully settles down. 



Our Pateyit Edge 2 i-inch Wide Corriigation is best /or Roofing 

COPYRIGHTED. 






THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 



9 



Pig. 9 







Shows application of our Curved and Straight Corrugated Iron to an Elevator, 

Mill, or Railroad Depot. 

This makes a substantial, durable, fire-proof covering of the finest architect- 
ural appearance, with which no plain sheets can at all compare. 

Fig. 10. 




i % inch Corrugation 




Use Roll and Cap Roofing for Flat Roofs 



COPYRIGHTED. 



■ 



IO 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 




Fig. 11. 




2 I /2-incli Corrugation. 



Shows relative appearance of two sizes of Corrugations. 



Fig. 13. 




A 



Shows our Improved Patent Edge, Corrugations 2^ inches, with 
new method of nailing— through tops of Corrugations. See pp. 18 and 23. 

The 1% and : 3 inch Corrugations are made chiefly of the Lighter 
gauges, and especialy approved for Ceilings, Linings and Wooden 
Shutters, combining an artistic finish with thorough fire-proof qualities 
but are not recommended for Roofing. 

Where used for interiors, this Iron is usually repainted when in 

place, to suit the taste of the users. 

This Iron is easily applied by any ordinary mechanic, without 
special tools or instructions other than contained herein. 



With the 1 ^-inch Corrugations our sheets measure 









L t 




when lapped one corrugation will cover 24 inches. 



No. 22, full width 25 inches, 
24. " 25 

" 26. : 

S. R- G., " 25 

We make also a very small corrugation, 3-16 inch wide, and of very 
slight depth ; sheets usually eight feet long and twenty-six inches wide. 

and standard Roofing Gauge. 



Regular Lengths of 1% and inch Corp:. Sheets 5, 6, 8, 9 and 10 feel 



COPYRIGHTED. 



i 



1 






THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 



ii 






This is used largely for fire-proofing Wooden Shutters, Sliding Doors, 
for Inside Wooden Frame Work, Timbers, etc., etc., for which it is more 

■ 

suitable than plain, flat iron. 

This Corrugation is so small that it can be bent crosswise, and indeed 
used in almost any place where flat iron can, 

The actual size of this corrugation is nearly that of Fig. n. 

Our Beaded Iron Ceiling is very neat and tasteful. Samples mailed 

on request. 

Fi?. 14. 




Shows our Angle Ridge Cap ; this is less expensive but equally as 
effective as that shown in Fig. 4. Made in two sizes. 



Fig. 15. 




Shows our Doable Curved Sheets for Awnings, Roofs, etc. 

Fig. 16. 




Shows clearly the practical application of Iron Ridge Cap and Wooden 
Ridge Joint to Corrugated Iron Roofing, demonstrating the usefulness of 
the combination better than anything but a storm could. 



Regular Lengths of Ridge Cap, 6 / t. 



COPYRIGHTED 



12 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 




Fig. 17. 




Represents a favorite style of Permanent Awning manufactured and 
sold very largely by us. It is in extensive use in Philadelphia and other 
eastern cities, where it is deservedly popular. Our Patent Edge Corruga- 
tions give these awnings a neat, paneled appearance. We will also furnish 
designs and estimates, when desired, on iron frames for awning supports. 

We always corrugate before painting, thus avoiding injury to paint 
by the machinery. In the ordinary process of painting first, the corru- 
gating causes more or less scaling off, which, of course, carries the paint 
along, leaving many bare patches, which soon rust. 

Fig. 19, on the following page, shows the Flouring Mill of Messrs. 
Cowen & Co., Memphis, Tennessee, covered with Corrugated Iron. Note 
its use on Sides, Awning and pitched portion of Mansard Roof. For 
deck of such Roofs our Standing Seam Plain Roofing is the best-see 

pages 24 and 25. # 

The appearance of Corrugated Iron for Mansard or Steep Roofs is lar 
superior to that of Metallic Shingles, as the latter can not be distinguished 

unless very near to the observer. 

We have many similar examples in different parts of the country. 

This view answers very well to indicate the appearance of such 
buildings, which is far superior to that of other material of equal cost, 
while it is equal to any in effeaiveness, and of far greater economy and 
safety from fire. 



Our Rolling Mill and Large Stocks Make Promptness Certain. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



13 



) 




Fig. 19 



Instructions for Applying Corrugated Iron. 



FOR ROOFING— WOODEN FRAMING. 

The only reliable Corrugated Iron for Roofing, now made, is our 

Patent Edge 2^-inch Corrugation. 

Begin to lay the sheets from the eaves, the first sheet covering the 
lower left-hand corner, projecting one corrugation over the side, and about 
three inches over the eaves. Hammer the projecting side corrugation 
down against the edge of sheating, nailing it in place. Nail across the 
sheets at eaves through tops of alternate corrugations. 

Next, place the second sheet to the right of the first, lapping over one 
corrugation of the first, and with the same amount of eave projection. 

We recommend that while the Roofing is being put on, you use a 
continuous string of thick metallic paint, paste or cement-made by mixing 
our dry metallic paint with linseed oil— between laps of sheets, to aid m 
making them water-tight. 
not been the slightest cause for complaint. 

Nail through these two sheets where they lap, and diredlly perpen- 



Where 



Reversed Ends of Roll Corrugated Sheets can not match. — Ours do 



COPYRIGHTED. 



14 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 







dicularly through the tops of the corrugations, and about eight inches 
apart. Nail, also, along the eaves as on the first sheet. 

Proceed in this manner from left to right across the length of the 
roof then begin at the left and lay the second row in the same manner 
as the first one, allowing the sheets to lap over the first row three to four 
inches, according to the slope of the roof and the length of sheets used, 
applving paste same as in side seams. 

Owing to the exactness of our corrugations, 3 inches end lap of our 
iron is as effective as 6 inches of ordinary roll corrugated iron. 

When nailing across the lower ends of sheets in the second row, put 
the nails about two inches from the end of sheet in order to have nails 

pass through both sheets. 

Do not put any nails at all through the interior of sheets. Always 
drive nails perpendicularly , and through tops of corrugations. 

We recommend the use of our Cone Head Steel Wire Nails without 
barbs, and for roofing, those two inches long, No. 9 wire. 

For Roofs with slight pitch, we recommend the use of our Wood 
Ridge Joint or Corrugated Wood, to be applied at each side of the comb 
or ridge of roof, and over which is to be placed the iron Ridge Capping, 
(See illustrations, Figs. 4, 5, 14 and 16 of Catalogue.) 

If any difficulty occurs in fitting Ridge Joint, saw it in two, cross-wise. 

Note.— If your worst storms and winds come from the left, you should begin 
at the right hand lower edge and work toward the left, and vice versa. 

Where the heavier gauges of Iron are used, Nos. 20, 22, or even 24, 
sheathing boards may be dispensed with, so far as providing support for 

the Iron is concer?ied. 

Where pitch of roof is considerable, for example, 6 inches to the foot, 

less lap than 3 inches will do at the ends of sheets. 

Where the pitch is less than 3 inches per foot, we recommend the use 
of our Standing Seam or Roll and Cap Roofing. See pages 24, 25 and 28. 

The rafters can be placed 3 to 4 feet apart, with purlins run through 
from 1 to 2 feet apart (see Fig. No. 3)— 1 foot is preferable where No. 24 
Iron is used — the pitch must be considered in this. 

With the lighter numbers, Nos. 26 and Standard Roofing Gauge, 
purlins or sheathing are recommended, but latter does not require to fit 

close, for general use. 

For flashing, see remarks under Figs. 5 and 28. 

Flash over a " Cant Strip," at upper side of skylights. 

Where warm air, steam or sulphur will come in contact with under 
side, use our Paraffined Felt Lining. 

Put shortest sheets nearest ridge 



Nails 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 15 






FOR SIDING— WOODEN FRAMING. 



Use either 2^-inch or i^-inch corrugations. 

In planning your structure arrange height of sides for using regular 
lengths with least lapping at end of sheets. 

Commence at bottom, running first row across side, lapping one 
corrugation at side. 

Our Patent Edge 2^-inch corrugations present a paneled appearance. 
Be very careful to keep Edge Corrugations plumb, and in line. 

Put the second row on in the same manner, lapping ends of sheets 
down over the top of the first row — one inch is sufficient for the lap. 

Where used without sheathing boards, the studding should be 
framed to measure from center to center, or if preferred, put the stud- 
dings say 3 to 4 feet apart, and nail the sheets to purlins, placing purlins 
say 2 feet apart and across the studding. 

Nail siding vertically on tops of corrugations, and horizontally 
between the corrugations. 

When studding is used, 2x4 inches will answer, usually. 

Using heavy iron and dispensing with sheathing boards lessens 
danger from fire, thereby reducing insurance. 

When the liability of damage from outside contact is considerable, 
heavier gauge should be used than otherwise necessary. 

Do not let the iron siding have contact with the ground. 

Our corrugated Iron can be used frequently as a substitute for cor- 
nice work in a very effective manner, by giving the subject consideration. 

A strip of iron corrugated diagonally or one used with corrugations 
horizontally disposed, often gives a pleasing effect. 

Some prefer differing lengths of sheets— breaking joints. 

We make WEATHER-BOARD SIDING and BEADED SIDING, 
also of iron, in sheets 8 feet long. (See pages 33 and 34.) 

FOR IRON FRAMES. 

The Side Laps should be riveted every 8 to 12 inches, and end laps 
on every other corrugation. 

To fasten the sheets to iron beams and purlins, a cleat of band iron, 
or fi inch wide should be passed around the purlins or beams and 
riveted at both ends to the sheet ; by contracting or pressing this cleat 
toward web of beams or purlins, a tight and secure fastening is made 
which allows for contraction and expansion of the sheet. 

For other directions, see foregoing. 





Lead Washers are a useless expense with our Pat. Edge Corrugated Roofing 



COPYRIGHTED. 






i6 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 




Iron Ceilings. 



The use of Iron-Corrugated, Crimped or Beaded— for Ceiling pur- 
poses is somewhat of a novelty, but has proven eminently successful and 

satisfactory. 

Our Iron Ceilings can be applied directly to joists if latter are level, 

or to rough sheathing over the joists or over the plaster. In the first case 
work is not so rapid as in the second where sheathing is used, and im 
some places is not attended with as good results. The advantage in the 
case of applying iron over plaster is that it can be done without remov- 
ing the old plaster, and thereby very little dirt is occasioned ; besides, it 
does not greatly interfere with business if the iron is put up in a store or 
office room. This item of cleanliness where re-ceiling is necessary is in- 
deed important. 

Builders and all practical men know that it is useless to adopt plaster 

ceilings in business houses, factories, etc., where there is much jarring 
or vibration from machinery and handling of heavy goods, for this will 
soon cause the plaster to fall off. Whenever a very small leak in a roof 
permits rain to drop down upon the plaster ceilings, it soon causes that 
portion to loosen and drop off, and it can never be repaired neatly. 

Wooden Ceilings, although not subject to the same criticism as 
above on plaster, are inflammable, apt to shrink, and are not always per- 
fectly dust-proof from above ; then the cost is fully as great if a neat pat- 
tern is used. Wooden ceilings are of course not so durable as sheet iron 
materials and are easily combustible. 

The weight of Metallic Ceilings such as we make is probably not 
over 20 per cent of the weight of plaster, so that this item figures con- 
spicuously in preparing frame work for any room of good size, churches, 

halls or stores. 

Plain Iron Ceilings are but very little more expensive than plaster, 

while ornamental metallic designs cost no more than paneled wood ceil- 
ings, frescoed plaster, or fancy designs in paper. 

We always give full instructions for applying the different styles of 
our ceilings, as the case may require, whether over plaster or to joists or 

sheathing. 

It is impossible for us to convey any true idea of the appearance of 
our Metallic Ceilings by the use of a wood cut, and the colors and style 
must always be harmonious to the general surroundings. 

We have several different materials adapted for ceilings, and we can 
end samples whenever desired. We also make special designs for par- 



Se?id for Illustrated Ceilifig Circular 



COPYRIGHTED. 






THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



17 



ticular rooms, and always prefer to quote prices after accurate dimensions 
are furnished. Always state height of ceiling from floor, whether the iron 
is to go over plaster, on joists or sheathing, what the room is to be used 
for, direction in which joists run, and whether a plain or ornamental 
ceiling is desired, whether any projection, etc. 

HOW TO ORDER ROOFING AND SIDING. 

(USE LOOSE SHEET INCLOSED HEREWITH.) 

For Ridge Roof Building, furnish us dimensions indicated per 

Fig. 20. 




For Shed Roof Building, furnish us dimensions indicated per 

Fig. 21. 




Allowing in above cases for necessary projection at eaves, ends, etc 




Our "Patent Edo-e 1 ' is the only Corrugated Iron suitable for Roofing. 



COPYRIGHTED. 






i8 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 




For Gables, furnish us dimensions indicated per 



Fig. 22. 




For curved sheets, always state whether for Roofing or ceiling, and 
furnish us dimensions indicated per 

Fig. 23. 




Allow for projections, if for roofing. 

If for Ceilings, state exact distance between webs of I beams, lengths 
and number of spaces to be covered. 

If shoes are used, state thickness of iron used in same, and give sketch 

of section of shoe and width of same. 

If you want us to cut to fit around openings, latter must be exactly 
located by figure showing distance from said openings in two different 
directions, at least, as well as the size of the openings. 

Remember that we cut Iron to fit up to the openings indicated, hence 
your dimensions of openings must include frames. 

Unavoidable waste, in cutting special orders from stock, is invariably 
charged at full price, and cost of cutting added. 

If ordered about three weeks in advance, and in quantity to justify, 
we can often have special sizes rolled as required, without extra charge, 
saving much waste and extra labor. 

Please note that we must have detailed figures, showing dimensions 
on all drawings and sketches of surfaces to be covered, and especiall) 
when any cutting is desired. 

We can not attempt to execute from a drawing or sketch, merely 
made to scale, without figures, as even the slight difference, almost 



Our Patent Edge 2)& inch Corrugated Siding has a Pane tied Appe< an 

COPYRIGHTED. 



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THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA. O. 



19 



unavoidable, between two persons measuring the most accurate drawing 
will produce a misfit in cutting special orders. 



We 



Fig. 24. 




Shows full size of our i^-inch Corrugations. 

Fig. 25. 



. 



Z Yz INCH 




Shows full size o( 2% inch Corrugations ; one interior Corrugation, 



y% inch deep, and Patent Edge Corrugation, % inch deeper. 

Owing to the form of our Patent Edge Corrugations it requires four 
per cent, less of our Corrugated Iron to cover a square than that of other 
manufactures. See pages 10 and 23. 

We furnish Corrugated Iron black, painted and galvanized. 

We rarely have calls for black, or unpainted iron, however, as it has 

become generally recognized that, for the best protection of the metallic 

surface, no moisture must be allowed to come in contact with it before 

painting. 

In shipping before painting, the iron incurs great risk of becoming 

wet, rusted, and thereby injured. 

In painting we use the best Metallic Paint, thoroughly reground with 
pure Linseed Oil in stone mills by steam power. 

Before painting, every sheet is rigidly inspected, and rejected if found 

imperfect. 

We paint all shee.s two coats, thoroughly applied by brushing. 
~ Inferior methods and materials are not effective or cheap at any price. 

This paint will not fade, crack or scale off; impervious to water and 
proof against fire sparks ; has a nice finish and a handsome color. 

The quality of the original coating is far more important than that of 
subsequent repainting, and the latter will be required much earlier and 
oftener if the factory painting is inferior. 

Galvanized Iron is universally recognized as the most durable. 

Our Coating is done with the greatest of care, and is superior in every 

respect. 










No Oil hut Linseed will Prevent Rust 



COPYRIGHTED 



20 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA. O. 




We 



' 



our list is too numerous and general, but will name our 
customers nearest to you on application. 

We have patrons in every State and Territory, and 
from Canada to Mexico inclusive. 

All goods delivered in suitable shipping condition, on 
cars, without extra charge therefore, unless in lots less 
than eight squares or equivalent. 

Let us have complete specifications of what you want, 
and, as costs vary from time to time, we will make you 
special quotations at lowest rates current. 

Remember that double-worked, box-annealed iron 
must be most durable, as it will not scale off, carrying 
the paint with it, as does the common iron used by irre- 
sponsible makers. 



Iron Lath. 



Fig. 26. 

Shows our Corrugated Perforated Metallic Lath for 
fire-proof buildings. 

This Lath is far superior to any other form of Metallic 
Lathing, and can be adapted to any kind of furring. 

It possesses the rigidity which wire lath lacks, and has 
ample openings for plaster, as shown in cut. The plaster 
also adheres firmly to the surface of these laths. 

The corrugations of our Lath give ample support for 

plaster. 

Our Lath is being used very extensively in Govern- 
ment Buildings, over 180,000 square feet being used in 
the U. S. Custom House and Post-office in Cincinnati. 

We can furnish this in any regular lengths not ex- 
ceeding ten feet. Those in stock are ninety-eight inches 
long, three corrugations wide. 





Fig. 26. 



No. 27 Iron is generally used for Lath, with 1 
inch corrugations; width of three-corrugation Lath, 3 

inches. 
We can make other widths and lengths and gauges. 



Is Price the Only Consideration 



COPYRICHTED. 



THK CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



i 




. 27. 




Shows a Flashing for chimneys, etc., to be made from a piece of fiat 
sheet iron ; can be formed when used. 

Fig. 28. 




This Flashing should run up several inches under the Corrugated 

Iron, which should stop off from the upper side of chimney far enough 

to allow rain to escape freely. 

The corrugations shown in Fig. 27 are to be formed over a corruga- 

tion of the roofing, 

The Corrugated Iron is to be flashed up at the sides of chimney, as 

shown in Fig. 28. 

Use cement freely. Counter Flashing may be used if desired. 



Other Makers can not Recommend Their Corrugated Iron for Roofing 



COPYRIGHTED. 



22 



THE CINXIXN I CORRUC IXG CO. PI L, O 




Corrugated Iron Shutters. 



Fig. 29. 





ViriiD 



We make several different styles ; and must have accurate dimen- 
sions of each opening. 

Send for Special Circular on Shutters. 



J e EACH ope s rat el) 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 23 



Special Notice. 



We particularly invite attention to the fact that we have perfected 
machinery whereby we furnish all our regular 2^-inch wide Corrugated 
Iron Roofing, and Siding, with our Patent Edge Corrugations % inch 
deeper than those in the interior of the sheets and of form as shown in 

Fig. 13. 

These Corrugations are also made so that the outer edges are nearly 
vertical instead of flaring, as is usual with iron corrugated with all other 
processes. 

The advantages of this improvement are : 

First, that the nails used in fastening can only be driven near the 
tops of the highest corrugations, and it is ihus impossible for rain to leak 
through, as the nail heads thus cover the holes best, and water drains 
away from nails promptly. 

Second, that the flange of the outside lapped corrugation of this 
style hugs tightly, while the ordinary Roll Corrugated Iron is only held 
tight at the nails, and flares open between, admitting rain freely. 1 

With our improved machinery we make a perfect sheet of Corru- 
gated Iron, guaranteed uniformly straight, flat, free from holes, warps and 
all imperfections. 

Such a Corrugated Sheet as we make can not be made by any other 
manufacturer, as we are sole Licensees. 

One Patent Edge Corrugation lap, at side of sheets, for roofing is 
more effective than a lap of two corrugations of other make. 

Each sheet is sheared on ends and sides, making it perfectly square. 
Every corrugation is perfect, having a uniform depth entire length of sheet. 

Side Corrugations are finished to make a tight, neat joint, of a * 

paneled appearance. See pages 10 and 19. 

Every Corrugation is a channel in itself, carrying off its share of the 
water quickly — not allowing it to remain and rust the roofs or flood the 

joints. 

It provides for contraction and expansion without warping or dis- 
placing the sheet. 

There is no solder to crack off with the heat as with tin. 

It is the cheapest covering, considering its lasting qualities. 

It never wears out if kept properly painted. 

It is easier to put on than any other metal covering. 

Any one who can drive a nail can attach it. 

It can be taken off and moved from one building to another. 






Accurate Comtgatin g can not be done with Rolls. I 



COPYRIGHTED. 



24 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 




Our Plain Roofings. 



Fig 30. 




SELF- CAPPING AND PACKED 

Standing Seam Steel Roofing. 

Sheets as shipped, 96 inches by 24 inches, will cover 93 >< inches by 



24 inches. 



Fig. 31. 




DETAILED DESCRIPTION. 

We present above an illustration of our improvement in Metallic 
Roofing, as applied to Plain Sheets, with which it is principally used. 

The novelty and merit of the invention consist in the application of 
a Water proof packing in the standing seam of the roofing sheets, thus 
effectually preventing their leaking. 

Letter A in the cut represents a sheet of Roofing in the position in 
which it is first laid upon the sheathing; B, a strip of Paraffined Felt, bent 
lengthwise, and fitted into standing seam of D. 

The first step in laying this roof is to secure sheet A to the sheath- 
ing, which is done by the application of a cleat C, the first curve of which 
fits over A. 

The Cleat is fastened to the sheathing by Steel Wire Nails driven 
through it at the point of dots shown on the plane of C. 



6J/3 Sheets to the Square. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 



25 



When A and C are thus placed and secured, the upward extension 
of cleat C remains in the same position as shown in Fig. 31. 

The ready packed Standing Seam of the next roofing sheet D is 
then placed upon and pressed downward over A and first curve of cleat C- 

The upward extension of cleat C is then turned downward over the 
crimp of D, which fastens the sheet to the sheathing. 

It will be observed that the Standing Seam of D thus forms a Steel 
Cap, integral with the sheet, covering the joints, and that the sheets are 
held to the sheathing without being punctured with nails, the whole being 
held to the sheathing by the cleats, which may be placed as frequently 
along the joints as may be required, or say 1 2 inches apart. 

It will also be observed that the sheets require no forming, except 
at the ends, which are locked in the usual way, as shown at A, Fig. 31, 
and at C, Fig. 32. 

Fig. 32. 




We always ship this Roofing with Packing fastened securely in 
place, so there is nothing more to do with it in using the roofing than if 

it were not present. 

This Roofing can be attached to "lath" or to sheathing, but not 
directly to rafters— for this use our Corrugated or V Crimped Roofing 

is most suitable. 

This Roofing is covered by thorough brushing with the best mineral 

paint, which is reground in pure linseed oil. This renders our Paint the 
most adherent and permanent in the market. 

The Standing Seams, which form the cap, being made from the 

sheet, can not loosen or blow off. 

The Packing fills each joint and closes it effectually against 

moisture. 

Its Weight per square (10x10 feet) is nearly eighty pounds (80 lbs.), 

nearly double the weight of tin, one-third the weight of shingles or 

gravel, and one-sixth the weight of slate, making it the most desirable roof. 



Lightning, Water, Fire and Wind Proof. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



26 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 




NONE BUT THE VERY BEST SOFT STEEL 

Is used in this Roofing. This we make in our own Rolling Mills, every 
sheet being rigidly inspected, and all imperfect ones are rejected. 

The material is painted on both sides with two coats of our Metallic 

Paint, 

General Directions for Laying P. S. S. Roofing. 

I 

Commence at the left-hand end of the roof, at the eaves ; take the 
sheet and straighten out the double standing seam or flange, and turn it 
over and nail against the barge board or flash up against the parapet wall 
(as the case may be) ; in latter case counter-flash in usual manner. 

Straighten up the single flange with mallet or tongs, so it will stand 

vertically. 

Make joint on upper end of sheet by turning lock with jointer ; then 

place the cleats along the single seam or flange, about one foot apart ; 

then join on another sheet the same way, turn locks at upper ends of 

sheets up, those at the lower end down. See A, Fig. 31, and C, Fig. 32. 

" Break Joints " in laying by using short or half length sheets to 
start every other course from eaves to ridge. 

Nail the ends of sheets down over edge of sheathing at the eaves. 

Be sure to place one cleat on each sheet at the point where the cross 



seam comes. 



The locks may all be formed before sheets are sent up on the roof. 



forming locks before shipping. 
When the comb or ridere 



H 




inch to turn up at the 
tige % inch, then turn 



it up and put cleats about one foot apart. 

This will finish the first course. 

Then lay the next sheet with double flange or seam over the single 
flange, with the packing in the f| crimp, press it down and turn the ends 
of the cleat over, so as to hold it in place : then take the tongs and press 
it together. 

Each length of standing seams must be closed at once with tongs as com- 
pleted. 

Avoid pressing the standing seams too close at tops— this is 
important. 

This finishes the standing seams ; continue this until this side of the 
roof is completed. 



Protect Your Buildings from Fire and Save Insurance. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 27 



Be careful to keep standing seams straight in line — you will thus have 
handsomest and most effective work. 

The other side is laid in the same way, and at the ridge, when the 
sheet is to be cut (if not quite long enough add a piece,) leave ^ inch to 
turn up to form a flange to meet the other side. 

After this side is all laid draw the two flanges together with the 
tongs, then take caps, such as shown at B, Fig. 33, and fit them over the 
two flanges on the comb, bend the end of the cleats over to hold them, 
and press together by using the tongs. 

A hip is made in a similar manner, and valleys are formed by ham- 
mering out the double flange and bending it over like C with the jointer, 
then throw the single flange over the same way, and lay this sheet in the 
valley, cleating it each side ; then put the packing in flanges, and hook, 
the roofing sheet into it and force it down to close both sheets, making 
it water-proof. 

Where warm air, steam or sulphur will come in contact with under 
side, use out Paraffined Felt Lining. 

We always ship tools and fastenings with orders unless otherwise 
notified. 

We furnish tools for laying this Roof, and charge actual cost, 
for the same, as follows : 

Tongs, per pair, $1 50 



Jointer, 



50 



Snips, 1 50 



Wooden Mallet, 



25 



Total, $3 75 

And will allow the same as charged for them if returned in good condition ,. 
freight prepaid. Always notify us when you return tools, attaching tag ta- 
identify them. 

We recommend using a wooden mallet instead of a hammer for 
closing cross seams or locks. 

After roof is all laid, mix the dry paint furnished with boiled linseed, 
oil, eight pounds to the gallon, and apply with a flat brush. 

If any holes are in the roof — caused by laying or miscuts, or flashing 
corners — work some of the paint into a putty or cement form first, paint 
the broken places, and then work the cement in. 

This will harden and effectually stop all leaks. 

Nails, cleats and extra paint, dry, are all furnished at cost. 

Small caps, for ridge roofs only, without charge, if you give us the 
length of your ridge in ordering. 



We recommend, our Corrugated Roofing for Applying over Shingles. 



COPYRICHTED. 



. 



28 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 




Roll and Cap Steel Roofing. 



Fig. 33. 








For roofs of dwellings, stores and other buildings having a fall of only 
one-half inch to one inch per foot, and when the rafters are not shorter 
than sixteen feet, we recommend the use of our Roll and Cap Roofing, 

illustrated in the above cut. 

The reason this style of Roofing is more effective than other kinds 
for nearly flat roofs, is, that we manufacture it in rolls fifty feet long or 
more, from sheets which are twenty-six inches wide by eight feet long, 
and the cross seams every eight feet are formed by us very perfectly with 
improved machinery, and when the flanges are bent up on each side these 
cross seams extend up to the top of these flanges, and there is almost no 
possible chance for leakage. 

Being in rolls, this style of roofing is more convenient to handle on 
roofs where there is but a slight slope to the rafters, as the side seams 
(which must be formed on the roof) are more easily made when the roof 
is nearly flat. Hence, when a roof has a pitch of say two inches per foot 
or greater, or in any case where rafters are shorter than sixteen feet, we 
recommend the use of our Standing Seam Roofing (Catalogue, page 24,) 
as being equally effective and more convenient to apply, it being in sheets 
eight feet long by two feet wide, with flanges already formed on sides of 
each sheet. 

At three inches, or greater pitch to the foot, any of our styles of 
Roofing will be thoroughly effective, including the Corrugated Iron. 
{See Catalogue, pages 5, 10, 13 and 23.) 






Model Samples Mailed on Request 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 29 



DESCRIPTION. 



The rolls, as usually made, are fifty feet long and twenty-six inches 
wide, being composed of painted sheets, firmly jointed at ends by our 
Improved Lock Joint, on our patented machinery, so that the joints can 
not become detached, or move from their position. 

Paraffined felt Packing is inserted in all cross locks. 

If customers request it in ordering, and give exact length of slope to 
be covered, we will make the rolls of such length as will exactly cover the 
lengths of slopes given, not exceeding one hundred and fifty feet. 

This is of great convenience in applying, and a saving of material. 

Caps ' ' B , " as shown in illustration, with paraffined felt packing therein, 
also cleat "C," barbed steel wire nails and extra paint, dry, are furnished 
with this Roofing at ten cents per square. 

As this style of Roofing does not require boxing or crating, you do 
not have to pay freight on packages, and it is much easier to handle in 
transit than roofing in crates. 

We wrap each roll of Roofing with heavy paper that will protect the 

- 

paint from being scratched in transit. 

We deliver on board cars at this city without charge, except on very 
small orders, when the dray age will be added. 



SPECIAL TOOLS TO BE USED. 



One pair Edging Tongs $2 50 

One pair Tongs for closing caps 1 50 



One pair Snips 



1 50 



Total cost $5 50 



We 



directed not to send them ; but will remit charge for tools promptly on 
return of them to us in good order, freight prepaid. 



Our Sheet Metal can be soldered after scraping the surface bright 



COPYRIGHTED. 



3° 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 




• 

Directions for Applying Roll and Cap Roofing. 



For use of our Roll and Cap Roofing it is best that the rafters be 
sheathed over entirely. 

Commence at either side of roof, turning down the outer edge of 
roofing, and nail to the face board, or flash up against the wall, as the 
case may be. 

Turn up the other edge of roofing with the edging tongs, forming a 
flange one inch high for general cases. 

We, as a rule, send out tongs for one-inch flanges, but can furnish 
them for one and one-fourth or one and one-half inch flanges if requested, 
for use on extremely flat roofs. 

The same kind of flanges to be turned upon each side of each strip 
of roofing as the work progresses. 

Nail the cleats down to the sheathing at intervals of about twelve 
inches along the flanges of strips first laid, so there will be a cleat at cen- 
ter and end of each cap, and after forming the flanges on the next strip, 
place it so that the flanges of the two strips touch, and are in a straight line. 

Before laying the next roll of iron, commence at eaves and put the 
caps, "B" over the two adjacent flanges, and as each piece of capping is 
laid, put the next piece of cap in place, lapping it about one inch down 
over the first piece as before, continuing to the ridge. 

Next, bend the vertical tongues of the cleats "C" over the caps and 
flanges tightly, by hand, proceeding to at once close up the joint perfectly 
tight with the tongs sent for that purpose. 

When one side of a ridge roof is covered, nail cleats to sheathing 
twelve inches apart along flange at the ridge, before laying the opposite 
side, for use in fastening ridge caps. 

The Roofing must be nailed over the edge of the eaves, and must be 
flashed up one inch each side at ridge, the flanges so formed to be covered 
by the same kind of caps as used previously on side seams, attached with 
cleats as before explained. 

Hips are to be formed on the same principle, after the sheets are cut 
to fit — allowing enough to turn up for flanges along the hip. 

Valleys are to be connected with the Roofing by a flat seam, similar 
to that used in locking the ends of the sheets. Fig. 32. 

Where warm air, steam or sulphurous smoke will come in contact 
with under side, use Paraffined Felt lining. 



Repaint lie Roofs Every Two or Three Years for First F. 1 } rs. 



_ 



COPYRIGHTED. 






THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



3i 



Standard V Crimped Iron Roofing. 



Fig. 34. 




Regular Sheets carried in Stock are 8 feet long and 2 feet be- 
tween Centers of Crimps, covering 93^ inches by 24 inches. 

We also make to order 6 and 10 feet lengths. 



This style of Roofing has been in use probably as long as any other 
style of Plain sheet-iron roofing, and has made for itself an enviable 
reputation. 

It may be applied to sheathing boards or lath, or directly over the 
old shingles without removing the latter, the same as shingles or our 
Standing Seam Roofing, but, since the nails are driven directly through 
the roofing sheet, a wooden /\ strip and sheathing, it can be fastened down 
more firmly than some other styles of plain roofing, and is therefore very 
favorably received in those parts of the country where high winds are of 
frequent occurrence. 

It can also be readily and successfully applied directly to rafters. 

All sheets are snipped at ends, ready for turning end locks, before 
shipping. 

As shown by the above cut, each sheet has a crimp in /y shape on 
each side. / 

In placing the sheets on the roof these crimps lap over each other 

and also over a triangular strip of wood which serves to support the 

joints firmly. 



imend the use of our Steel Wire Nails 1^ inches long, so 
that the nail after being driven through the two edges of iron sheets and 
the wood /\ strip, is long enough to reach ^ inch into the sheathing. 






[ft zua. ' Every F\ ? Y rs. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



r 



3 2 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO.. P1QUA, O 




Fig. 35. 





The above cuts explain how to nail sheets down and how two sheets 
are spliced or hooked together to make any length desired ; of course for 
long rafters it may be necessary to hook together some three, four or five 
sheets or more. This is to be done as explained on pages 26 and 27. 

For making tight joints at ridges of comb roofs, it is best to use our 
small size Capping, illustrated in Figs. 4 and 14 of Catalogue, (for prices 

see list ) 

Allow the roofing sheets to project one inch over the eaves, and then 

bend this projection down against the wood frame-work, nailing it fast to 
prevent wind and water blowing underneath. 

We can not recommend this style of roofing to be used where the 
pitch is less than two inches to the foot ; for nearly flat roofs we suggest 
the use of our Standing Seam Roofing, or Roll and Cap Roofing. (See 

pages 24 and 28.) 

This Roofing being applied without the use of cleats or other patent 

fastenings, is most simple and easy in its application, and is, therefore, 

often preferred by farmers and others who can not employ mechanics. 

Where warm air, steam or sulphur will come in contact with under- 
side, use our Paraffined Felt Lining. 

The tools necessary to properly apply this Roofing are : 



Pair Tinners 1 Snips . . . 
Turning Iron (or Jointer) 
Wooden Mallet 




These charges 
are actual cost. 



We always send tools, nails and dry paint unless otherwise notified.. 






We 



us in good order, freight prepaid. Always notify us when you returm 
tools and mark their shipping tag with your name. 



Allow Corrugated Roofing three inches Pitch, or more, to the foot. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



33 




Iron Weather-Boarding. 



Fig. 36. 




Regular Sheets as shipped are 8 feet 2 inches long, having 5 faces or 
" boards " of 4^ inches each. 

As an effective and fire-proof substitute for wooden weather-board- 
ing or " clapboards " our iron sheets formed in imitation of them, as 
shown by the above engraving, are attracting general attention and 
meeting with perfect success wherever used. 

To all who desire a fire-proof building, the necessity of using Iron 
Siding is apparent, and our iron sheets of Weather-boarding have been 
found to supply the want admirably. 

This Weather-boarding is made of good, strong, iron ; and we paint 
both sides, before shipping, with our iron-ore paint of a red color, but we 
suggest, in repainting the iron after it is put in place, to use a stone or 
slate colored paint, thus adding much to its general appearance. 

This material can be attached to rough sheathing boards or directly 
to studding placed 16 inches apart between centers. 

In applying our Weather-boarding, it is necessary to lap the sheets 
one crimp at sides and about z inches at ends. Place nails about 4 to 6 
inches apart along the horizontal laps when the iron is put on sheathing, 
and immediately under the projecting crimp always; When applying 
to studding, nail to each stud. At vertical laps place one nail at the 
uppermost edge of each face or " board." 



Felt Roofings are not Durable or Cheap at any Price. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



34 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 




Place a few nails throughout the body of the sheet so as to hold it 
firmly against the studding or sheathing. 

All nails must be driven directly under the projections to avoid 

indenting the iron. 

No special tools are required in putting on this iron, and any ordi- 
nary mechanic can do the work well and neatly if ordinary caution is 
used to keep the lines straight horizontally. This is important. 

We make a special Angle Strip of iron to be used with this material 
at the corners of buildings to cover the edges of the weather-board sheets 
and make a neat finish. This must be ordered specially. 

In ordering Iron Weather-boarding it is always best to furnish us 
with a pencil sketch, with figures showing accurate dimensions of spaces 
you wish to cover. (See enclosed order blank.) 



Beaded Sheet Iron for Ceilings and Siding 



Pig. 37. 







Regular sheets measure 25 inches and cover 2 feet in width, and are 
5, 6, 7 and 8 feet long. 

Each of the nine crimps in our Beaded Ceiling Iron is y 2 inch wide, 
and, being three inches apart center to center, each sheet covers 2 feet in 
width on the ceiling after lapping over the side crimps. 



Nothing is Really Cheap unless Effective for its Intended Use 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O 



35 



It is our usual custom to make, and carry in stock at all times, sheets 
8 feet long, and of Standard Roofing Gauge, and unless otherwise speci- 
fied, we will ship this thickness with all orders placed with us. 

This style of ceiling is very desirable in stores, warehouses, factories, 
engine rooms, boiler rooms, cotton gins, paper mills, etc., where it is 
necessary to have a fire-proof and durable ceiling and siding. 

Beaded Iron Ceiling can be applied directly to rafters, studding or 
over plaster ; but it can be put on to sheathing boards more easily and 
quickly, besides presenting a better appearance. 



When 



for ceilings of Beaded 



Iron, with paneling strips, molding, ornaments, etc., the same as tor 
Corrugated Iron. 

No Special tools are required to apply this Beaded Ceiling. 

The sheets should be lapped one or two inches at ends, and over one 
crimp at sides. 

Whenever desired we will estimate total cost of ceiling any room, if 
pencil sketch is sent to us with accurate dimensions marked thereon. 

Our Beaded Sheets can be cross striped with paint to imitate brick. 

Weights Per ioo Square Feet Flat 



By which our iron and steel for corrus-atin 



g are rolled 



are for 



Standard Roof Gauge 6 4 Pounds 



No. 26 Gauge, 



it 



24 



1 . 



" 22 






a 






20 
18 
16 



1 » 



i 



ic 



72 

88 



1 12 



140 
196 

260 



Being Birmingham W. G., as given in Haswell's Engineers' Book 
for over forty years, and used by Phoenix Iron Co., Union Iron Mills, 
Pottsville Iron and Steel Co., and many other prominent concerns. 




Investigate, then order from the most reliable ?nakers 



COPYRIGHTED. 



36 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 




Our Metallic Paints. 

All of our material is painted on both sides with two coats of our 

superior Metallic Paint. 

This paint has proved to be the best roofing paint in the world. 

It is made by time tried methods approved by the longest experience, 
consisting of the'best metallic paint thoroughly reground in pure Linseed 
Oil. in a stone mill, operated by steam power. 

It is especially adapted as a protection to iron, tin or wood. 

Apply the third coat after the roof is put on, and it will last for years 

without deterioration. 

All imperfect sheets are rejected by us before painting. 

Our drying rooms have 15,000 sq. ft. floor space, and we carry an 
assortment of about 500 tons of Painted Iron constantly, hence can furn- 
ish you Painted Iron thoroughly dry, without necessity of using excessive 
dryers and thinners, which greatly lessen the durability of the paint. 

The inferior oils and methods used by some cannot produce paint 
which will protect iron or steel sheets ; hence roofing and siding covered 
with such paints are not cheap at any price, as they cannot be durable. 

No real substitute for Linseed Oil has ever been discovered. Piqua 
is next to the largest and best Linseed Oil market in the United States. 
DIRECTIONS FOR APPLYING OUR METALLIC PAINT ON OLD METALLIC ROOFS. 

First clean off the roof, removing all scaly paint or other matter, so 
that the surface may be firm and clean. Look carefully for all holes. 

broken seams, etc. 

If none, proceed to paint, rubbing the paint out well as you apply it. 
If any breaks in joints or seams, mark them with a scratch-awl. Mark 
all holes made by rust or nails. Then coat each place with the paint. 

Take good cotton unbleached muslin, tear in strips large enough to 
cover one inch each side of the break. Take a trowel and spread the 
cloth with our Cement Paint. Then lay it over the broken place, patting 

it down firm and smooth. 

Put a small lump of the Cement Paint into all the rust and nail holes, 

and paint lightly over it. 

Treat leaks around chimneys, flashings, or skylights, same as broken 

seams. Then paint the whole surface. 

Keep the paint well stirred, and rub it out well. No dryer is necessary. 

If paint is too thick, add one quart of boiled linseed oil to the gallon. 

This can also be used for painting any kind of metal or wood which 
is exposed to the weather. 



In our Factory every detail is carefully supervised 



COPYRIGHTED. 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 37 




t 



General Adoantages of Iron and Steel Roofing. 

OVER SHINGLES. 

Shingles were once made of the best selected timber, and lasted 
longer than now; they are now made mostly of limbs, old cuttings, and 
such inferior timber as can not be used for anything else ; are short-lived 
at best, also frequently leak, and are easily combustible. 

The average life of shingle roofs is now ten years, and in towns where 
coal is used, much less. 

Insurance is about one-third less in case of an Iron or Steel Roof. 

OVER SLATE. 

Slate roofing is very costly, all things being considered. 

Slate roofing will crack by freezing and thawing, and from heat of 
adjacent fires, or being walked upon will break and slide off. 

Six or seven times as heavy as iron, it requires a strong and expens- 
ive structure to bear it up, and an extreme pitch, which makes a large 
amount of surface. 

Slate often causes a building to settle out of shape, and the rule of 
measurement is always greater than for Iron Roofing. 
There is great loss from breakage in using slate. 

OVER TIN. 

Some of our agents are tinners, and from them and our own observa- 
tion we learn these facfts : the tin plate now used for roofing is made 
light, cheap and inferior, to compete in price with iron and steel, 
which are now gaining the lead ; the iron plates are so thinly coated with 
tin or lead that many are uncovered, and at best it is difficult to hold the 
solder strongly. 

Solder is a weaker material than tin, and breaks from contraction, ex- 
pansion, and other natural causes. 

Our material both takes and holds paint far better than tin, and as 
the paint is the protection to either iron or tin roofs, the surface 
that holds paint the best is the safest to use. 

Tin roofs get out of repair so often that there are five leak}- tin roofs 
to one of our material. 

Manufacturers who have large buildings and have used our Roofing, 
universally approve it. 

Our Roofing is unquestionably the strongest and most durable. 

Tin ought to be laid on tight sheathing, which costs about one 
dollar per square extra, while our Roof can be applied on "lath" the 
same as pine shingles, or over an old roof. 



We manufacture the greatest variety of Fire-proofing Materials made 



COPYRIGHTED. 



3« 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA O. 




We 






IT IS RUST PROOF, 

Costs less than tin or slate or shingles, and will outlast any of them. I 

The saving in insurance will pay the difference in a very lew years, j 

between this and the cheapest roof that can be put on. 

It is suitable for all kinds of roofing, and can be laid where an other 1 

roof can, and is effective atone inch fall to the foot — although a good j 

pitch is i od for any roof. j 

Our method of forming the seams is acknowledged by all to make 
the best, the simplest, and most flexible joint ever invented. 

This is evidenced by the favor with which it is received by architect 
builders and mechanics, wherever it has been introduced. 

There is no such a thing as a leaky roof, or one being blown off, 
when put on by our methods. 

Our seams have sufficient flexibility to compensate for all expansion 
or contraction of the metal. 

NONE BUT THE VERY BEST REFINED IRON OR STEEL 

Is used in our Roofing. This we manufacture especially for our own 
use, and all imperfect sheets are rejected. 

CISTERN WATER. 

Those using the water from any of our Roofings will be pleased to 
find how much cleaner the rain-water is than from a shingle or gravel 
roof — both very retentive of dirt. 

The covering being smooth, the wind keeps it clean from all dirt, 
leaving none to wash into the cistern. * ( 

Our paint, being made from pure oxide of iron and linseed oil 
thoroughly reground together, is not injurious in the slightest degree 

LIGHTNING. 

Few persons realize the protection afforded during a violent thunder 
storm by being in a building covered with iron. 

Prof. Mitchell and other scientific men say that it is impossible for a 
building to be struck by lightning when covered by iron. 

The great surface exposed dissipates the electricity : it is only dang- 
erous when concentrated. 

Iron steamers are never harmed by lightning, 

HOW LONG WILL IT LAST? 

Every one knows that as long as iron does not rust it will last, and if 
it is kept painted it will not rust. 

There never is any wear on the under side to take the paint off, and 
if the upper side is painted every two to four years we do not see any- 
thing to prevent its lasting fifty years, or more. 



COPYRIGHTED. 






THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., PIQUA, O. 



39 




National Iron Roofing Association Rules. 



I 



,«<!- rt TH " the , above ° r gamzation, held at Cincinnati, Ohio, March 23rd, 
nt,7tf„ A uf re f S0 ' Ut ' 0ns were ad °P'ed as the uniform rules tor measure: 

Tannarv , SS r 8 Association, taking effect April Is t, .887 ; reaffirmed 

STANDING SEAM AND ROLL AND CAP. 

Resolved, The rules of measurement in selling Standing Seam Roofing shall 
be as follows : When shipped as sheets, the full length of Sheets shall be meas- 
ured unih end locks turned or considered as turned; when shipped in Rolls, with 
the sheets locked together, the running length of the Rolls shall be measured 
together with the actual covering width of the Sheets or Rolls. 

CRIMPED EDGE. 

Resolved, The rule of measurement for V or Crimped Edge Roofing shall be 
as follows : The//.// length of sheets shall be measured, without any allowance 
for end locks or laps, together with the actual covering width. 

CORRUGATED AND BEADED. 

Resolved, The rule of measurement in selling Corrugated Roofing, Siding or 
Ceiling, and Beaded Iron Siding and Ceiling shall be the>// measurement after 
being corrugated or beaded, no allowance being made for either side or end laps. 

SMALL CORRUGATIONS. 

Resolved, That Corrugated Iron of less than 2 in. corrugation, and all Irons 
Corrugated Crosswise of sheets be sold at not less than ft ve per cent, aavance 
over price of regular corrugated. 

NAILS, ETC. 

Resolved, That in no case shall Nails, Paints, Paper Felting, Wood Strips 
or Tools, be furnished free with Roofing, but shall be charged for as additional 
items in the Bill of Roofing. 

PRICE LIST. 

Resolved, That the following be the Price-List of the members of the Associa- 
tion on Painted Roofing. 

Standard Roofing Gauge, "Roll Cap" Roofing, per square, $4.25 

Standing Seam " « « 4.00 

Crimped Edge " " " 3 . 75 

" Beaded Siding and Ceiling, per square, 3.75 

" Roll Ridge Capping, per lineal foot, 12c. 

A " " " " " loc. 
Standard Roofing Gauge, Corrugated, per square, $3.75 

****• ^°» 4.00 

1NO - 2 4, 4-75 

No. 22, " «• " " 5 75 

No. 20, " " " " 6 75 

All orders less than 8 squares package and drayage extra. 




Widths 



COPYRIGHTED. 



4 o 



THE CINCINNATI CORRUGATING CO., P1QUA, O. 




Certificates of City Officials. 



Cincinnati, O., February 28, 1885. 

To the Cincinnati Corrugating Co. 

Gentlemen:— My experience fully sustains the justice of the fire laws of Cin- 
cinnati, and the usage of the insurance companies doing business in our city, viz., 
in ranking Corrugated Sheet Iron with brick or stone for practical efficiency 
against fire. Joseph Bunker, Fire Marshal. 

St. Louis, OcStober 19, 1878. 

To WHOM IT MAY CONCERN: 

We, the undersigned, certify that, in our opinion, based upon experience, the 
corrugated iron buildings are as fire-proof as sjrudlures built of brick or stone, 

for the following reasons : 

When wood is used as a framing for the corrugated iron buildings, its quantity 
is so small that it is insufficient to feed a conflagration, and when consumed, 
the iron still remaining in sheets, falling upon the fire, forms a shield, thus prevent- 
ing the communication of the flames to adjoining buildings, while a brick wall 
crumbles and allows the flames to go in every direction. A whole town constructed 
of buildings covered with corrugated sheet iron, taking fire, would burn with less- 
rapidity than brick structures, and, beyond doubt, no faster. We have these build- 
ings in St. Louis, and no difference is made in the insurance between them and 
brick structures. C. T. Aubin, Civil Engineer; 

Secretary St. Louis Board of Underwriters* 
H. Clay Sexton, Chief Fire Department, St. Louis. 



ss. 



STATE OF MISSOURI, 
City of St, Louis. 

Be it remembered, that on this 19th day of Odlober, 1878, personally appeared 
before me, C T. Aubin, Secretary of the Board of Fire Underwriters of the City of 
St. Louis, and H. Clay Sexton, Chief of the Fire Department of the City of St. 
Louis, who are personally known to me to be the same persons whose names are 
subscribed to the foregoing statement, and being by me first dulj- sworn, each for 
himself upon his oath, said that said statement was true to the best of his know- 
ledge and belief, and that the signature hereunto appended was his true and 
genuine signature. 

In Witness Whereof, I have hereunto set my hand and seal, at the City of SU 

Louis, this 19th day of October, 1878. 

J. P. Dawson, Notary Public. 

[seal.] Term expires August 6, 1881. 



NOTICE. 

We do not imitate other manufacturers, and respectfully ask 
that others will not copy our illustrations and verbiage, thus 
avoiding legal punishment under the United States Law. 









Our Sterling Goods make Steady Customers. 



COPYRIGHTED. 



1 



\ 



INDEX. 

Pages. 

- - 7,8.18 

Arche- 

ii, 12 

Vwnings , 

Beaded Ceiling "' ID ' ° 4 

19 

Black Iron 

Buildings ' ' * \ b \ 9 ' [] 

, . ... 4, 8, ii, 16, i8, 34 

ceilings .... . ; , AO 

Certificates ....•• 4 

Clap-Boarding 7 8 18 

Corrugated Arches q ' 

Corrugated Sheets 5* », 9, io. 2 3 

, • - - 7, 9, ii, 18 

Curved Roofs '^' ' 

, „,, 7, ii, 18 

Curved Sheets ' 

Dimensions of Sheets 5, io, 19, 24, 28. 3L 33, 34 

Directions for Applying .... 5, 8, & M, 15, 16, 26, 27, 30, 3 1 . 32, 33, 34, 35 

Directions for Ordering 5 • ' : s 

Durability 4 ' 37 ' 3 „ 

Elevators g 

i levator Sheets / m - : * * 

Estimates 4, 5, I*. '7, 18, », 34 

. 24, 25, 27 

F«tem»g8 £ *J 

Flashing .... 19 

Galvanized Iron _*< _ 

General Advantages % S 

Insurance 4, 37, 3 

Iron Frames 

20 

Lath 

Lengths of Sheets 5,8.10,20,24,28,31,33.34 

Merits of Corrugated Iron 4, 23, 37, 3 

Metallic Paint- 19, *5, *7, 33, 3*. 3» 

Moldings for Ceilings 35 

National Iron Roofing Association "39 

Packed Standing Seam Roofing 14, 24, 25, 26, 27 

Painted Iron . * 9 ' \ 

„ x . IO, IQ, 1\ 

Patent Edge Corrugation 20 

References ^ 

Rid S eCa .P .'.'.'. '.'.6,7,11', 14 

Ridge Joint 2 8 29 30 

Roll and Cap Roofing yy J _ 

Sheets to the Square ^ 

Shutters 

Square— Definition of _ " ' ' 

Tools, Special Roofing \i L 

V Crimp Roofing 3 ' 3 

Weather- Boarding 33 

Weights per Square . . .3 

Width of Sheets 5. 10, M. »8, 31, 33. 34 








•) 






til 




Cincinnati Conmgatiri 





Co. 



OUR CORRUGATED AND PLAIN 




Metal Coverings 



FOR ROOFS AND SIDES OF BUILDINGS OF EVERY KIND, 

Have conclusively shown their superiority, and are specially adapted, and 
the best article known for covering all kinds of structures, such as 



COAL BREAKERS, 


ROLLING MILLS, 


NAIL MILLS, 


R. R. BUILDINGS, 


WAREHOUSES, 


BLAST FURNAC 


FOUNDRIES, 


MACHINE SHOPS, 


BLACKSMITH SHOPS, 


SMELTING WORKS, 


BRIDGES, 


BARNS, 


AWNINGS, 


CAMPS, 


— -* C 



RESIDENCES, 

GRAIN ELEVATORS, 
FLOURING MILLS, 
CAR SHOPS, 
CAR ROOFS, 
SNOW SHEDS, 

COTTON GIN HOUSES, 

COTTON WAREHOUSES, 

COTTON COMPRESS BUILDINGS. 
POWDER HOUSES, 
SAW MILLS, 

MARKET HOUSES. 
STABLES. 
SHEDS. 



CEILI NG 




i 

* 



FOR 



OFFICES, BOILER AND ENGINE ROOMS, RESIDENCES, DRY 

HOUSES AND ALL FIRE-PROOF BUILDINCS. 



SHUTTERS. DOOR,S. liATH. 







1